Copyright 2019 Change Media and Mulka Carving. Photo by Johanis Lyons-Reid

Formerly known as Black Screen, Nunga Screen features an entertaining program of independent films for all ages from emerging to the more established film-makers.  Inspiring docos, compelling dramas, quirky animation, contemporary to traditional storytelling – this film event is dedicated to bringing communities together to share in culture.

Taking place in NAIDOC Week this year, this free event will showcase 13 films across regional South Australia, from town halls, to cinemas to drive-ins.

From animation in Nganu and Tjilbruke: A Tale of Two Dreaming Heroes to documentaries to controversy in Mulka Man, Adnyamathanha Elder Roy Coulthard, the last wood carver of the Flinders Ranges who crosses traditional conventions to teach women the art of Mulka wood carving, to courtroom drama in Language Matters to primary school children’s films, each Nunga Screen film has been chosen for its originality, humanity and skill.

Across the films you will recognise well-known names that have paved the way for younger generations including Lillian and Elaine Crombie and Allan Sumner who share their wisdom and strength.

Don’t miss FREE event Nunga Screen this year during NAIDOC Week.

Inspired by the National Film & Sound Archive’s Black Screen program, Nunga (Aboriginal people of southern South Australia) Screen is presented by Country Arts SA and the ‘Give up Smokes for Good’ campaign from Drug and Alcohol Services of South Australia (DASSA), with support from the South Australian Film Corporation.

This year there’s a great selection of films, with something for everyone. Find out more about the films you will see at Nunga Screen below. *Please note that each screening might not screen all the films below, check with your local venue to find out their exact program.

Reconciliation
A film by Christies Beach Primary School

Sing along to ‘We’re All in this Together’ with the students of Christies Beach Primary School, winners of the Reconciliation SA Schools Video Competition in 2019.

Running time: 1:55 mins | Rated G

Nganu and Tjilbruke: A Tale of Two Dreaming Heroes

Two Kaurna Nation dreaming heroes Nganu and Tjilbruke are at the centre of this animated short film for the whole family.

Developed through partnership between Monash University, Kaurna Warra Karrpanthi Aboriginal Corporation and South Australian Commission for Catholic Schools, in consultation with Kaurna Elder Uncle Lewis O’Brien.

Running time: 9:50 mins | Rated G

Sibosado Brothers – A Portrait
A film by Bryan Mason, Closer Productions

Growing up in Lombadina, north of Broome, art has always been part of brothers Garry and Darryl’s life.  Known for their art practice of Riji – the traditional art of carving symbols and designs onto pearl shells, this beautifully shot film captures the artists at work as they prepare for a major Tarnanthi exhibition.

Running time: 4:10 mins | Rated G

Dusty Feet Mob – This Story’s True
A Tallstoreez / Change Media Production – Directed by Marika Davies and Johanis Lyons-Reid

Port Augusta’s Dusty Feet Mob have danced their way into the hearts and minds of audiences across the country.  Through the power of song and dance they tell stories of the Stolen Generation and help heal the hurt of the past.  Go behind the scenes with the young dancers as they prepare to perform to Archie Roach’s powerful song Took the Children Away.

Running time: 9:35 mins | Rated G

The Mulka Man
A Tallstoreez / Change Media Production – Directed by Marika Davies and Johanis Lyons-Reid

Meet the Mulka Man, Adnyamathanha Elder Roy Coulthard, the last wood carver of the Flinders Ranges.  With time against him, Uncle Roy is determined to see his tradition live on.  To do so he crosses traditional conventions to teach women the art of Mulka wood carving.  Journey with Uncle Roy on country from the rich ochre sands of Port Augusta to the stunning Flinders Ranges, as he passes his tradition to the next generation.

Running time: 8:22 mins | Rated G

Big Al’s Big Dream
A film by Clem Newchurch

Big Al’s Big Dream has come alive.  Earlier this year, Ngarrindjeri and Kaurna man Allan Sumner, a local artist who has dedicated his life to creating art as a legacy for his family, took the bold step of launching an Aboriginal cultural centre. Gain an insight into Allan’s tumultuous life journey, his love of creating art and his drive to bring community together.

Running time: 14:30 mins | Rated G

In this Together
A film by Westport Primary School

Congratulations to Westport Primary School, winners of 2020 Reconciliation SA Schools Multimedia Competition.  Students from pre-school all the way through to Year 7 came together to produce this delightful film which embodies this year’s National Reconciliation Week theme of ‘Coming Together’.

Running time: 6:29 mins | Rated G

Yunga Nungas
A film by Edoardo Crismani

Yunga Nungas changes lives.  This inspiring documentary gives voice to the young fellas in the Yunga Nungas youth justice program.  We hear first-hand how the structured activities, skills-based training and time spent with mentors, has provided participants with encouragement to break the cycle and look to a positive future.

Running time: 14:28 mins | Rated PG

Language Matters
A film by Edoardo Crismani

A role reversal comedy set in a courtroom where proceedings are delivered in Pitjantjatjara language. In this mock trial community are judge and jury while the actual Chief Justice of SA (in court for drinking too much coffee) plays the defendant, helpless with no understanding of the language being spoken and totally reliant on a translator.

Running time:  13:52 | Rated PG

Crombie Crew
A film by Edoardo Crismani

Lillian and Elaine Crombie are two strong Aboriginal women and successful artists across stage and screen.  Hear from this talented duo as they paint a portrait of their relationship as performers and as mother and daughter.   The Crombie Crew is playful and spirited and takes us to the very heart of Lillian and Elaine’s connection to each other.

Running time: 10:03 mins | Rated PG

Cissie
A film by Pascoe Braun

On Christmas Day 1974 Cyclone Tracy hit Darwin. Cissie Muir Cubillo was a survivor. She remembers her beautiful Mother and celebrates her own incredible journey to a new life in Adelaide.  A true story of resilience, survival and love for family.

Running time: 15:00 mins | Rated G

Wirridji – Something bad will happen
A film by Stuart Martin and Tamara Whyte

Senior Ranger, Otto Campion Bulmaniya (Rembarrgna) in East Arnhem Land watches as the meteorological forces of Tropical Cyclone Lam and Aboriginal (serpent) totems rise in action. Otto explains that when caring for country is under threat, land, dreaming and lore work as one to reclaim country and restore the balance.

Running time: 5:00 mins | Rated PG

Stuck in time
A film by Stephen de Villiers

Howie was 15 when he found himself in the wrong place at the wrong time. Recently released from prison and on lifetime parole, he is now dealing with lost time and life on the outside.  Howie is determined not to become a statistic. He has dreams and aspirations. Stuck in Time is his story.

Running time: 15:00 mins | Rated M

Nunga Screen is sponsored by Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia – Give up Smokes Campaign

Kaurna and Narrunga first nation’s ambassadors for the Give Up Smokes campaign turned what was to be a Rundle Mall dance event earlier in the year (cancelled due to COVID), to a First Nations Flash Mob on film.  The message here is Give Up Smokes to breathe easier and dance longer.

Choreographed by Nikki Ashby.

Frankie Films.

Run time: 1:19 mins

Nunga Screen 2020 is supported by

Sera Waters: Domestic Arts
  • Visual Arts

Sera Waters: Domestic Arts

26th September 2020 — 31st October 2021

This exhibition subverts and unravels the baggage-laden yet wondrous category of making once labelled ‘domestic arts’

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Robyn Stacey: Ray of Light
  • Visual Arts

Robyn Stacey: Ray of Light

20th October 2020 — 14th November 2020

First shown at the 2016 Adelaide Biennale of Australian Art: Magic Object, Sydney-based photographer Robyn Stacey used camera obscura to depict the city of Adelaide as it has never been seen before.

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